Deep-sea microbes as tools to refine the rules of innate immune pattern recognition

Gauthier AE, Chandler CE, Poli V, Gardner FW, et al. Sci Immunol. 2021 Mar 12

The assumption of near-universal bacterial detection by pattern recognition receptors is a foundation of immunology. The limits of this pattern recognition concept, however, remain undefined. As a test of this hypothesis, we determined whether mammalian cells can recognize bacteria that they have never had the natural opportunity to encounter. These bacteria were cultivated from the deep Pacific Ocean, where the genus Moritella was identified as a common constituent of the culturable microbiota. Most deep-sea bacteria contained cell wall lipopolysaccharide (LPS) structures that were expected to be immunostimulatory, and some deep-sea bacteria activated inflammatory responses from mammalian LPS receptors. However, LPS receptors were unable to detect 80% of deep-sea bacteria examined, with LPS acyl chain length being identified as a potential determinant of immunosilence. The inability of immune receptors to detect most bacteria from a different ecosystem suggests that pattern recognition strategies may be defined locally, not globally. … Continue readingDeep-sea microbes as tools to refine the rules of innate immune pattern recognition

Colistin heteroresistance is largely undetected among carbapenem-resistant Enterobacterales in the United States

Band V, Satola S, Smith R, et al. mBio 2021 Jan 26

Heteroresistance is a form of antibiotic resistance where a bacterial strain is comprised of a minor resistant subpopulation and a majority susceptible subpopulation. We showed previously that colistin heteroresistance can mediate the failure of colistin therapy in an in vivo infection model, even for isolates designated susceptible by clinical diagnostics. We sought to characterize the extent of colistin heteroresistance among the highly drug-resistant carbapenem-resistant Enterobacterales (CRE). We screened 408 isolates for colistin heteroresistance. These isolates were collected between 2012 and 2015 in eight U.S. states as part of active surveillance for CRE. Colistin heteroresistance was detected in 10.1% (41/408) of isolates, and it was more common than conventional homogenous resistance (7.1%, 29/408). Most (93.2%, 38/41) of these heteroresistant isolates were classified as colistin susceptible by standard clinical diagnostic testing. The frequency of colistin heteroresistance was greatest in 2015, the last year of the study. This was especially true among Enterobacter isolates, of which specific species had the highest rates of heteroresistance. Among Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates, which were the majority of isolates tested, there was a closely related cluster of colistin-heteroresistant ST-258 isolates found mostly in Georgia. However, cladistic analysis revealed that, overall, there was significant diversity in the genetic backgrounds of heteroresistant K. pneumoniae isolates. These findings suggest that due to being largely undetected in the clinic, colistin heteroresistance among CRE is underappreciated in the United States. … Continue readingColistin heteroresistance is largely undetected among carbapenem-resistant Enterobacterales in the United States

On-tissue derivatization of lipopolysacharide for detection of lipid A using MALDI-MSI

Yang H, Chandler CE, Jackson SN, et al. Analytical Chemistry 2020 Sep.

We developed a method to directly detect and map the Gram-negative bacterial virulence factor lipid A derived from lipopolysaccharide (LPS) by coupling acid hydrolysis with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI). As the structure of lipid A (endotoxin) determines the innate immune outcome during infection, the ability to map its location within an infected organ or animal is needed to understand localized inflammatory responses that results during host–pathogen interactions. We previously demonstrated detection of free lipid A from infected tissue; however detection of lipid A derived from intact (smooth) LPS from host–pathogen MSI studies, proved elusive. Here, we detected LPS-derived lipid A from the Gram-negative pathogens, Escherichia coli (Ec, m/z 1797) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa, m/z 1446) using on-tissue acid hydrolysis to cleave the glycosidic linkage between the polysaccharide (core and O-antigen) and lipid A moieties of LPS. Using accurate mass methods, the ion corresponding to the major Ec and lipid A species (m/z 1797 and 1446, respectively) were unambiguously discriminated from complex tissue substrates. Further, we evaluated potential delocalization and signal loss of other tissue lipids and found no evidence for either, making this LPS-to-Lipid A-MSI (LLA-MSI) method, compatible with simultaneous host–pathogen lipid imaging following acid hydrolysis. This spatially sensitive technique is the first step in mapping host-influenced de novo lipid A modifications, such as those associated with antimicrobial resistance phenotypes, during Gram-negative bacterial infection and will advance our understanding of the host–pathogen interface. … Continue readingOn-tissue derivatization of lipopolysacharide for detection of lipid A using MALDI-MSI